Category Archives: Glaucoma

Bronx Optometrist

Glaucoma testing in the South Bronx

Bronx Optometrist

Bronx Optometrist

Regular eye exams with our Bronx optometrist, Dr. Alan Vilinsky, are important to keep prescriptions current as well as diagnosing common eye diseases. Early detection is always best for proper and thorough treatment and as experts at Eye Express, we pride ourselves on personal attention and educating all patients on common eye diseases. After cataracts, glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Glaucoma is caused by a number of different eye issues that result in gradual vision loss due to damage to the optic nerve.

There are two main types of glaucoma in adults: primary open-angle glaucoma and closed-angle glaucoma. Open-angle glaucoma is the most common form and occurs when the pressure inside the eye rises because of fluid backup. Over time, as this pressure builds up, it damages the optic nerve and results in permanent and irreversible vision loss. Closed-angle glaucoma is more rare and occurs when the drainage canals of the eye get blocked causing a rapid increase in pressure inside the eye. According to research and our Bronx optometrist at Eye Express, individuals at high risk for glaucoma should have a dilated pupil eye examination at least every two years. Our doctors use several tests to detect glaucoma and when proper testing is conducted, like the exams offered at Eye Express, not only can glaucoma be caught early on, but other vision threatening diseases as well, such as cataracts.

With cataracts, screenings are so important because cataracts can develop slowly with no pain or loss of vision and when detected early further damage may be avoided and treatment can begin. Our Bronx optometrist will begin by conducting a comprehensive eye exam that includes a cataract screening. A cataract is a clouding of the clear lens in the eye and makes it look as if you’re looking through a fogged-up window. Some signs that you should definitely have a cataract screening are increased eye strain, difficulty driving at night, irritated by bright lights, blurry or double vision, fading colors, and frequent changes in your eyeglass prescription.

Diabetes increases your risk of glaucoma and cataracts but can also cause the harmful eye disease known as diabetic retinopathy. As a leading cause of blindness, this is the most common diabetic eye disease in American adults. You may not notice any changes to your vision, if you have diabetic retinopathy, but over time it can get worse and cause vision loss. Our Bronx optometrist will perform a comprehensive eye exam which is the only reliable means of detecting diabetic retinopathy and other common eye diseases.

Diabetic Eye Care Bronx
220 East 161ST Street
Bronx, NY 10451
718-681-9744

Melrose Glaucoma Testing

Melrose Glaucoma Testing

With early diagnosis and proper medical treatment by your Melrose eye doctor at Eye Express, glaucoma can be controlled. Though there is no cure at the present time, glaucoma can be treated with medication to protect you from permanent optic nerve damage. Once detected by Dr. Alan Vilinsky during your routine eye examination at Eye Express in Melrose, glaucoma will require long-term and ongoing care. Dr. Vilinsky will customize a treatment plan that will carefully control your eye pressure.

Glaucoma is typically treated with the use of medications that help the fluid drain better or decrease the amount of fluid made by the eye. Glaucoma medications have been proven to safely control eye pressure for many years. However, there are additional treatments, including eye surgery. In cases of chronic glaucoma, surgery is considered when the maximum amount of medicines is not controlling your eye pressure.

If you’d like to learn more about glaucoma and the various treatment options offered at Eye Express, please schedule an appointment with our eye doctor today!

Eye Doctor Melrose
220 East 161ST Street
Bronx, NY 10451
718-681-9744

Glaucoma Testing Bronx

Glaucoma Testing Bronx

Eye Exams Bronx

Eye Exams Bronx

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of vision loss. Sometimes called the silent thief of sight, glaucoma can damage your vision so gradually you don’t notice any loss of vision until the disease is at an advanced stage. Glaucoma can be detected through regular eye examinations by your Melrose Bronx eye doctor, Dr. Alan Vilinsky. During this painless procedure, your optometrist will measure your intraocular pressure, inspect the drainage angle of your eye, evaluate any optic nerve damage, and test the vision of each eye. The best way to maintain your eye health and preserve your vision is to have regular and complete eye examinations with the appropriate level of diagnostic testing for glaucoma.

There are two main types of glaucoma: Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Angle-Closure Glaucoma. Though both are caused by increased pressure in the eye, the two yield different symptoms and levels of severity. Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common type of glaucoma and causes peripheral vision loss. In an eye unaffected by glaucoma, fluid continually flows through the eye and exits through tissue known as the trabecular meshwork. With chronic glaucoma, this meshwork becomes blocked and fluid is unable to flow out of the eye. This excess fluid causes intraocular pressure to increase and presses against the optical nerve. While chronic glaucoma gradually builds up, angle-closure or narrow-angle glaucoma occurs suddenly and presents painful symptoms, such as headaches, nausea, eye pain, and increased sensitivity to light.

If you are diagnosed with glaucoma during your regular eye exam at Eye Express in the Bronx, we’ll attempt to control the disease with medications to regulate the amount of fluid produced by the eye. If medications cannot adequately treat your glaucoma, Dr. Vilinsky may suggest surgery to increase drainage flow. To learn more about glaucoma treatment options, come speak to our eye doctors at Eye Express!

Melrose Bronx Optical Store
220 East 161ST Street
Bronx, NY 10451
718-681-9744

Eye Exam Bronx

Eye Exam Bronx

Experience Computerized Eye Exams at Eye Express in the Bronx

Here at Eye Express, we incorporate computerized technology to assist the evaluation of eyeglass prescriptions, peripheral vision, intraocular pressure, and eye health. Computerized eye exam instruments are used to supplement rather than replace personalized care. A computer-based vision exam provides more features than a traditional slide projector displaying the letter chart. By using a computer monitor during a Bronx Eye Exam with a direct lighting source, it creates ideal contrast between the black

Optometrist in Bronx

Optometrist in Bronx

letter or object against a white background. Because contrast can be manipulated on a computer, your eye doctor can assess contrast sensitivity, a different measure to assess vision. Low contrast testing can reveal vision problems that aren’t easily detectable through high contrast testing. Another benefit of using computerized eye exams is that a computer chart offers very crisp letters, as well as the option to randomize and rearrange the line size and sequential order to avoid patient memorization while reciting letters.

At Eye Express in the Bronx, our vision examination is designed to detect a wide range of problems affecting vision function, such as blurred vision or eye discomfort. Keeping your eyes healthy is important and an annual eye exam can help detect a number of eye diseases or conditions before they become more serious problems. Adults should have their eyes tested regularly to keep their eyeglass or contact lens prescription up to date, as well as monitor for early signs of eye disease. Pediatric eye exams are important as early as age two as vision plays a crucial role in ensuring normal vision development and consequently, academic achievement for all kids.

Pediatric Eye Care Bronx
220 East 161ST Street
Bronx, NY 10451
718-681-9744

Glaucoma Eye Test Bronx

Glaucoma Eye Test Bronx NY

Glaucoma refers to a category of eye disorders often associated with a dangerous buildup of internal eye pressure (intraocular pressure or IOP), which can damage the eye’s optic nerve that transmits visual information to the brain.

With untreated or uncontrolled glaucoma, you might eventually notice decreased ability to see at the edges of your vision (peripheral vision). Progressive eye damage could then lead to blindness.

In fact, glaucoma creates at least some vision loss in more than half of the approximately 2.5 million Americans estimated to have the eye disease and is the second leading cause of blindness.

Early detection, through regular and complete eye exams, is the key to protecting your vision from damage caused by glaucoma.

It is important to have your eyes examined regularly. Your eyes should be tested:

before age 40, every two to four years
from age 40 to age 54, every one to three years
from age 55 to 64, every one to two years
after age 65, every six to 12 months

Anyone with high risk factors, should be tested every year or two after age 35.

A Comprehensive Glaucoma Exam

To be safe and accurate, five factors should be checked before making a glaucoma diagnosis:
Examining…    Name of Test
The inner eye pressure    Tonometry
The shape and color of the optic nerve    Ophthalmoscopy (dilated eye exam)
The complete field of vision    Perimetry (visual field test)
The angle in the eye where the iris meets the cornea    Gonioscopy
Thickness of the cornea    Pachymetry

Regular glaucoma check-ups include two routine eye tests: tonometry and ophthalmoscopy.

Tonometry

Tonometry measures the pressure within your eye. During tonometry, eye drops are used to numb the eye. Then a doctor or technician uses a tool called a tonometer to measure the inner pressure of the eye. A small amount of pressure is applied to the eye by a tiny tool or by a warm puff of air.

The range for normal pressure is 12-22 mm Hg (“mm Hg” refers to millimeters of mercury, a scale used to record eye pressure). Most glaucoma cases are diagnosed with pressure exceeding 20mm Hg. However, some people can have glaucoma at pressures between 12 -22mm Hg. Eye pressure is unique to each person.

Ophthalmoscopy

This diagnostic procedure helps the doctor examine your optic nerve for glaucoma damage. Eye drops are used to dilate the pupil so that the doctor can see through your eye to examine the shape and color of the optic nerve.

The doctor will then use a small tool with a light on the end to light and magnify the optic nerve. If your intraocular pressure is not within the normal range or if the optic nerve looks unusual, your doctor may ask you to have one or two more glaucoma exams: perimetry and gonioscopy.

Perimetry

Perimetry is a visual field test that produces a map of your complete field of vision. This test will help a doctor determine whether your vision has been affected by glaucoma. During this test, you will be asked to look straight ahead and then indicate when a moving light passes your peripheral (or side) vision. This helps draw a “map” of your vision.

Do not be concerned if there is a delay in seeing the light as it moves in or around your blind spot. This is perfectly normal and does not necessarily mean that your field of vision is damaged. Try to relax and respond as accurately as possible during the test.
Your doctor may want you to repeat the test to see if the results are the same the next time you take it. After glaucoma has been diagnosed, visual field tests are usually done one to two times a year to check for any changes in your vision.

Gonioscopy

This diagnostic exam helps determine whether the angle where the iris meets the cornea is open and wide or narrow and closed. During the exam, eye drops are used to numb the eye. A hand-held contact lens is gently placed on the eye. This contact lens has a mirror that shows the doctor if the angle between the iris and cornea is closed and blocked (a possible sign of angle-closure or acute glaucoma) or wide and open (a possible sign of open-angle, chronic glaucoma).

Pachymetry

Pachymetry is a simple, painless test to measure the thickness of your cornea — the clear window at the front of the eye. A probe called a pachymeter is gently placed on the front of the eye (the cornea) to measure its thickness. Pachymetry can help your diagnosis, because corneal thickness has the potential to influence eye pressure readings. With this measurement, your doctor can better understand your IOP reading and develop a treatment plan that is right for you. The procedure takes only about a minute to measure both eyes.

Why Are There So Many Diagnostic Exams?

Diagnosing glaucoma is not always easy, and careful evaluation of the optic nerve continues to be essential to diagnosis and treatment. The most important concern is protecting your sight. Doctors look at many factors before making decisions about your treatment. If your condition is particularly difficult to diagnose or treat, you may be referred to a glaucoma specialist. A second opinion is always wise if you or your doctor become concerned about your diagnosis or your progress.

(glaucomoa.org)